Articles to Read

Powerful Language Patterns

If X, then Y.

This is purely an X/Y relationship. If you do X, then Y will happen. It works because it is a construct of our language that causes an automatic response. It also is taught to us in mathematics. “If you picture yourself using this product, then you need to go ahead and purchase it today.” The statement does not have to make logical sense. The “if” is a construct that forces the mind to accept the statement. If you believe that, then you’ll be well on your way to success.

It is very similar to the word “because.” The word makes us comply. I have noticed this pattern causes a light trance with people. Often they ask, “What did you say?”

If you have enjoyed this material then you will love the three-day workshop. It is even more powerful than you thought.

One can, (person’s name),…

Use the ambiguity of the statement one can (i.e., Who can?) and by adding the person’s name, it will cause a direct relationship with the client. The combination slips by the conscious mind, right into the subconscious.

After all, “One can, Jim, enjoy the experience of buying.”

I wonder if you will X or not.

The first part of the sentence is a command for action. It is a question that the answer to which is yes. I wonder if you can… (obviously you can).

“I wonder if you can enjoy the years of pleasure this product will give you, or not.” The “or not” simply reduces resistance to the command.

When you X, don’t you Y?

A variation of the X/Y relationship. For example, “When you make a decision, then don’t you always take immediate action?” “Successful people don’t wait.”

Can you imagine X?

The obvious answer to this question is, “Yes, I can imagine it.” It directs people’s focus to a particular vision. “Can you imagine yourself using these phrases and doubling your salesresults?” “Can you imagine how good it will feel to own this service?” “Can you imagine, if you took action today, how much better your life would be next year?”

Whatever direction you want to focus them, just say, can you imagine this…

If X, then Y.

This is purely an X/Y relationship. If you do X, then Y will happen. It works because it is a construct of our language that causes an automatic response. It also is taught to us in mathematics. “If you picture yourself using this product, then you need to go ahead and purchase it today.” The statement does not have to make logical sense. The “if” is a construct that forces the mind to accept the statement. If you believe that, then you’ll be well on your way to success.

It is very similar to the word “because.” The word makes us comply. I have noticed this pattern causes a light trance with people. Often they ask, “What did you say?”

If you have enjoyed this material then you will love the three-day workshop. It is even more powerful than you thought.

One can, (person’s name),…

Use the ambiguity of the statement one can (i.e., Who can?) and by adding the person’s name, it will cause a direct relationship with the client. The combination slips by the conscious mind, right into the subconscious.

After all, “One can, Jim, enjoy the experience of buying.”

I wonder if you will X or not.

The first part of the sentence is a command for action. It is a question that the answer to which is yes. I wonder if you can… (obviously you can).

“I wonder if you can enjoy the years of pleasure this product will give you, or not.” The “or not” simply reduces resistance to the command.

When you X, don’t you Y?

A variation of the X/Y relationship. For example, “When you make a decision, then don’t you always take immediate action?” “Successful people don’t wait.”

Can you imagine X?

The obvious answer to this question is, “Yes, I can imagine it.” It directs people’s focus to a particular vision. “Can you imagine yourself using these phrases and doubling your salesresults?” “Can you imagine how good it will feel to own this service?” “Can you imagine, if you took action today, how much better your life would be next year?”

Whatever direction you want to focus them, just say, can you imagine this…

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